This Is the No. 1 Thing That Holds Most People Back From Success

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What’s the number one thing that holds most people back from success? It’s not intelligence or hard work.

It’s your attitude.

Sound like the drivel your parents told you when you were 16 that inspired eye-rolling? That’s what I thought, too. But then I kept seeing the same thing over and over from experts and research…

The War For Talent Is a Myth

Marketing genius Seth Godin says it’s actually a war for attitude:

…it’s not really a search for talent. It’s a search for attitude. There are a few jobs where straight up skills are all we ask for. Perhaps in the first violinist in a string quartet. But in fact, even there, what actually separates winners from losers isn’t talent, it’s attitude.

What does Harvard tell its MBA students is the number one thing when negotiating salary?

First, they need to like you. That’s the first component. The things you do that make them like you less make it less likely that you are going to get what you want. Now I’m not saying attitude is everything. There’s experience, education and other factors, of course, but…you’d be surprised how little even some of those matter.

Hard working? Meh. Overrated.

Stanford MBA school professor Jeffrey Pfeffer explains the research shows performance is only loosely tied to who gets ahead.

Via Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t:

The data shows that performance doesn’t matter that much for what happens to most people in most organizations. That includes the effect of your accomplishments on those ubiquitous performance evaluations and even on your job tenure and promotion prospects.

Studies show being liked affects performance reviews a lot more than actual performance.

Via Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t:

In an experimental study of the performance appraisals people received, those who were able to create a favorable impression received higher ratings than did people who actually performed better but did not do as good a job in managing the impressions they made on others.

It’s a Popularity Contest—And Often for a Good Reason

If you catch yourself saying, “But I’m right and they’re wrong!” — congratulations, you now have a confirmed attitude problem. Yes, it is a popularity contest — and not necessarily unfairly.

People with more friends at the office perform better at the office.

Via The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work:

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